The Seven Deadly Sins

 

All maps and documentation can be downloaded here

Featured in WIRED Magazine, September 2009 Issue, available  here

Nevada Public Radio interview, April 3rd, 2009, KPNR 88.9 FM, available here

Topeka Capitol Journal, March 7th, 2010, here

Methods

Sloth was calculated using the total expenditures on arts, entertainment and recreational activities compared to employment per capita.  Data was obtained through the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2002 Economic Census: Arts, Entertainment and Recreation Report.

Greed was calculated using the total per capita income compared to the number of inhabitants below the poverty line per capita, with data obtained through the U.S. Census Bureau. 

Envy was calculated using the total number of thefts (Robbery, Burglary, Larceny and Motor Vehicle Thefts) per capita based on data obtain through the Federal Bureau of Investigation – Uniform Crime Report and the National Atlas.

Gluttony was calculated using the total number of limited-service eating places per capita and is based on data obtained through the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2002 Economic Census: Food Services and Drinking Places Report.

Wrath was calculated using the total number of violent crimes (Murder, Assault and Rape) committed per capita, and is based on data obtained through the Federal Bureau of Investigation – Uniform Crime Report and the National Atlas. 

Lust was calculated using to the total number of per capita sexually transmitted diseases (HIV, Aids, Syphilis, Chlamydia, and Gonorrhea) based on data obtained through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Pride was calculated as the aggregation of the previous six sins.


References

Aquinas, Saint Thomas. 1991. Summa Theologiae: A Concise Translation. Ed. McDermott, T. Benziger Bros. Perrysburg, Ohio.  Pp. 651. (http://www.ccel.org/ccel/aquinas/summa.txt) (Accessed on 07-February-2009)

Alagherii, Dantis. The Divine Comedy. Translated by Longfellow, H. W.  (http://www.ccel.org/d/dante/inferno/infer02.htm) (Accessed on 15-November-2008)

Federal Bureau of Investigation. 2009. Uniform Crime Report.: All Years.  Washington, D.C. (http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm) (Accessed on 15-February-2009)

National Atlas. 2009. People: Crimes, Energy, Consumption, Mortality. (http://www.nationalatlas.gov) (Accessed on 15-February-2009)

New Advent. 2009. The Catholic Encyclopedia. (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/index.html) (Accessed on 09-March-2009)

Office of Women’s Health. 2009. Quick Health Data Online: Disease. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, D.C. (http://www.healthstatus2010.com) (Accessed on 02-January-2009)

Pauls, M. and Facaros, D. 1998. Traveller’s Guide to Hell. Cadogan Books. London.

Refoule, F. (1967) Evagrius Ponticus. In Staff of Catholic University of America (Eds.) New Catholic Encyclopaedia. Volume 5, pp. 644–645. McGrawHill.  New York.

Sinkewicz, R. R. 2003.  Evagrius of Pontus: The Greek Ascetic Corpus. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press 2003, p. 416.

U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Business and Industry: Sales/Receipts and Establishments

U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Employment.

U.S. Census Bureau. 2000.  Income and Poverty

U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Population, Housing Units, Land Area, and Density

Mitchel Stimers, Ryan Bergstrom, Tom Vought and Michael Dulin


Capital vices, cardinal sins, or more commonly, the seven deadly sins, have been discussed and debated since at least the 4th century, when Evagrius Ponticus, a Roman born monk who relished praise from his peers (vanity), and married women (lust), first wrote of the eight evil thoughts from which all sinful behavior was based.  These evil thoughts; gluttony, fornication, avarice, sorry, anger, discouragement, vainglory, and pride, were later revised in the 6th century by Pope Gregory I to constitute the seven deadly sins; Luxuria (Lust), Gula (Gluttony), Avaritia (Greed), Acedia (Sloth), Ira (Wrath), Invidia (Envy), and Superbia (Pride).  From the 14th century onwards, the notoriety of the deadly sins in popular culture has grown, most notably in Dante Alighieri’s, 14th century masterpiece, the Divine Comedy.  This obsession (gluttony) is seen today within the modern arts, music, television, film, comic books and most recently, video games.  The authors undertook the task of statistically representing the seven deadly sins throughout the U.S. and Nevada to determine what, if any, spatial coincidence occurred.  Each of the deadly sins was given separate treatment based on sociologic and economic characteristics, while pride, the “greatest” and “root” of all sins, was determined to be the aggregation of each sin.  This work represents one of two separate but related works that are meant to be enjoyed consecutively (gluttony).